Tag Archives: lamb

Lamb Meatballs with Currants adapted from The Jerusalem Cookbook

31 Mar

Lamb meatballs

It seems like meatballs are everywhere lately—and I definitely don’t hate it. These little balls of goodness are the perfect meal; comforting, satisfying and really simple to make. And with so many variations you can find an excuse to eat them any time of the year.

When my aunt called me the other day asking what to make for Easter dinner, I didn’t even have to think about my answer. At first she was hesitant, given that we normally serve lamb chops, but I convinced her that lamb meatballs would be just as delicious and would even appeal to my younger cousins.

This recipe is adapted from Yotam Ottolenghi’s version in the Jerusalem cookbook. I made them this weekend as a test batch so I could perfect the recipe for Sunday. Turns out, not a whole lot needed to be perfected. They’re absolutely delicious.

The trickiest part is getting the meat to brown perfectly. If the meatballs begin to burn, turn down your heat slightly and move them away from the center of the pan. Try starting out with one ball, so you can get the hang of it before doing the rest.

They don’t need to be perfect, so they’re a lot of fun to make and even more fun to eat. I served them over bulgar but you can use any grain you like. I’m thinking I’ve just stumbled upon a new Easter dinner tradition.

Lamb Meatballs with Currants

1 lb. ground lamb
1 yellow onion
1 cup breadcrumbs or panko
3 tbs. mint, cilantro, parsley, chopped
3 cloves of garlic, minced
1 tsp. each of ground cumin, coriander, cardamom and cinnamon
1 egg, beaten
4-5 tbs. olive oil
3 cloves of garlic, sliced
6 green onions, sliced
1 tbs. currants
2 tbs. lemon juice
2 cups chicken stock

Combine the first seven ingredients in a large bowl along with salt and pepper. Mix thoroughly and form into small balls about the size of a golf ball. Heat one tablespoon of the olive oil over medium-high heat in a large pan or Dutch oven. In small batches brown the meatballs all over, adding more oil with each batch. When finished, place the meatballs on a plate and set aside.

Heat the remaining olive oil in the same pan over medium heat. Add the garlic and green onions and sauté about 5 minutes. Add the currants, lemon juice, chicken stock, salt and pepper and cook for another 5-10 minutes over low heat with the lid on. Add the meatballs back into the pan and let simmer for thirty minutes with the lid on until cooked through.

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Rosh Hashanah

17 Sep

Rosh Hashanah Food Traditions

The Leek omlette, Swiss Chard omlette, Black-eyed peas, and Dates have two interpretations. First, all are eaten as foods that relate to the words they represent. For example, leeks are called Karsi, which is related to the word karet meaning to cut off or destroy. The blessing that goes with the leek omlette says, “[m]ay all your enemies be cut off.” They are pretty much the old food puns, like eating lettuce to say “lettuce” (“let us”) have a good new year. The second interpretation is that these are the foods the Gemorrah, a written Jewish text, recommended Jews eat on this holiday.

Pomegranate:

Pomegranate seeds symbolize merits. The blessing says “[m]ay your merits be many like the seeds of a pomengranate.”

Challah and sugar:

Challah is the bread that is always blessed on Jewish holidays. On Friday nights for Shabbat, challah is dipped in salt to remember the destruction of the second temple, but on Rosh Hashanah, challah is dipped in sugar for a sweet new year. The challah is also round, symbolizing the cyclical nature of the year and creation.

Fish or lambs head:

Sometimes Rosh Hashanah will feature a fish head on the table. This is to sybolize Rosh Hashanah as the head, or start, of the year. It is a fish because fish symbolizes fertility.

New fruit:

Every year you are supposed to try a new fruit, representing the new year. In the past few years, I’ve had quince, rambutan, and Chinese melon. It’s an excellent way to explore different types of ingredients and cultures.

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