Tag Archives: omelette
Quote

Breakfast Thoughts

26 Sep

“The way you make an omelet reveals your character.” -Anthony Bourdain

What kind of omelet will you be making for breakfast, and how will it reveal your character?

Photo by Paul Goyette (CC-BY-SA-2.0), via Wikimedia Commons

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Rosh Hashanah

17 Sep

Rosh Hashanah Food Traditions

The Leek omlette, Swiss Chard omlette, Black-eyed peas, and Dates have two interpretations. First, all are eaten as foods that relate to the words they represent. For example, leeks are called Karsi, which is related to the word karet meaning to cut off or destroy. The blessing that goes with the leek omlette says, “[m]ay all your enemies be cut off.” They are pretty much the old food puns, like eating lettuce to say “lettuce” (“let us”) have a good new year. The second interpretation is that these are the foods the Gemorrah, a written Jewish text, recommended Jews eat on this holiday.

Pomegranate:

Pomegranate seeds symbolize merits. The blessing says “[m]ay your merits be many like the seeds of a pomengranate.”

Challah and sugar:

Challah is the bread that is always blessed on Jewish holidays. On Friday nights for Shabbat, challah is dipped in salt to remember the destruction of the second temple, but on Rosh Hashanah, challah is dipped in sugar for a sweet new year. The challah is also round, symbolizing the cyclical nature of the year and creation.

Fish or lambs head:

Sometimes Rosh Hashanah will feature a fish head on the table. This is to sybolize Rosh Hashanah as the head, or start, of the year. It is a fish because fish symbolizes fertility.

New fruit:

Every year you are supposed to try a new fruit, representing the new year. In the past few years, I’ve had quince, rambutan, and Chinese melon. It’s an excellent way to explore different types of ingredients and cultures.

The Family Leek Omelette

21 Aug

My favorite holiday of the year is Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. On this holiday everything you eat is supposed to be sweet to represent a sweet New Year. In Syrian tradition, you also eat other symbolic foods to keep enemies away and to bless you with a year of many merits.

One of my favorite foods is the leek omelette. When cooked correctly, it comes out thick, has a perfect golden brown color, and is delicious. I remember being scared to learn how to make this omelette because of all the hot oil involved. It’s difficult to flip and there is a high likelihood splashing yourself with hot oil, especially in the first few cooking attempts. Additionally, if you flip it too early, the whole omelette falls apart and you need to just start again.  For years, I needed my grandpa on the phone before (and sometimes during) the omelette making process. I have to say, though, my omelette now rivals his.

Leek Omelette Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 leek (at least 1 inch wide)
  • 3 eggs
  • 3 tablespoons matzah meal
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon cumin
  • oil for frying

Directions

Cut the tops off of the leek where the leek becomes darker green. Half the leek length-wise and then half it again. Cut very fine, making approximately ¼ inch slices. Rinse very well, making sure no sand or grit is left. This can be done by soaking slices in a shallow bowl of water and letting grit fall to the bottom. Cook for 15 minutes in boiling salted water. Rinse in cold water and drain.

In the meantime, separate the eggs. Beat white until they are foamy but not quite stiff. Beat the egg yolks.

Add the leeks to the egg whites. Next add the salt and cumin and mix. Add the egg yolks and matzah meal. Mix well.

Heat a 9 inch frying pan with about 1/8 inch oil. Add mixture making sure that it spreads out. Cover and cook on medium heat until bottom is brown. Turn over using a plate to help flip the omlette and fry the other side until it is golden brown as well.

This dish can be served hot or cold. Because it is like a frittata, it can be eaten for breakfast, lunch, or as a delicious dinner sidedish.

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